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When Do Kittens Get Their First Shots

Are There Any Risks With Vaccinating My Kitten

5 Kittens Get Their Vaccines | Incredible Dr. Pol

Vaccines are very safe for your kitten and they shouldnt suffer any long-term ill effects. Its quite common for them to be a bit lethargic or out of sorts after the jab but they usually recover quickly. Very rarely a kitten may suffer breathing difficulties or seizures. If youre at all worried its best to contact your vet straight away.

When Should My Cat Be Vaccinated

Generally, the immunity that a kitten has at birth only lasts for a few weeks. It is then time to begin vaccination. The first vaccination is usually given in two doses, the first dose at around the age of 8-10 weeks and the second about 3-4 weeks later. Thereafter, your cat will require annual booster vaccinations for the rest of his/her life to maintain protection. Of course, these are only guidelines your veterinary surgeon will be able to determine the exact schedule thats right for your pet.

Basic Vaccine Schedule For Cats

Cat vaccinations can get confusing. Not only are there different schedules and needed vaccines for cats and kittens, but there are also some extra vaccines for different lifestyles.

Its difficult for pet parents to understand their cats vaccination schedulefrom which ones they need to how often they need them.

While there are certain mandatory, or core vaccines for cats, there are also noncore vaccines for different lifestyles or vaccines that are only recommended during the kitten years.

Your veterinarian is your best resource for figuring out the best vaccine routine for your feline family member, but this chart will help you understand the basics.

To help you navigate the world of feline vaccines, the chart covers a kittens vaccination schedule all the way into adulthood.

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Are There Any Risk Associated With Vaccines

On some occasions, your kitten may experience some lethargy after his/her appointment. This is a big day for them, from the car ride to the exam itself and can make them very tired. On a rare occasion, they could have a vaccine reaction. There may be some pain where the vaccine was given or your cat may develop a mild fever.

When Can You Vaccinate A Kitten

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According to the VCA Hospitals, kittens have passive immunity from antibody absorption from their mother through the intestine for 24 to 48 hours after birth. This protects them against disease during the first few weeks of life but they need to build longer-lasting active immunity in order to remain protected against these diseases. Vaccines promote active immunity, but they must be given at the correct time.

Because it’s impossible to predict when a kitten will lose its short-term immunity, a series of vaccines spaced at regular intervals boost the cat’s chances of developing active immunity. The aim is to administer at least two vaccines during the critical window after the kitten loses maternal immunity before exposure to infectious disease.

Kittens need vaccine boosters every one to three years to maintain active, long-lasting immunity.

Talk to your veterinarian about your kittens lifestyle and discuss their kitten vaccination schedule to determine whats best for your pet.

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Core Vaccinations What Basic Vaccines Kittens Need

Core vaccines are a kittens first vaccinations that protect against the most common and fatal diseases for cats and are recommended by all veterinarians.

Feline rhinotracheitis, feline calicivirus, and feline panleukopenia are what shots kittens need to get a healthy jump on life. Theyre often combined into one vaccine that can be administered as early as 6 weeks of age, with booster shots administered every 3-4 weeks until they reach 16 weeks of age. To avoid over vaccinating, most vets recommend starting this vaccine at 8 weeks of age, with boosters at 12 and 16 weeks.

Feline Rhinotracheitis

  • Feline Rhinotracheitis is triggered by the common feline herpes virus. It can cause sneezing, runny nose, drooling, crusty eyes, lethargy, and weight loss. If left untreated, it can lead to dehydration, starvation, and eventually death.

Feline Calicivirus

  • Calicivirus affects the respiratory system and may cause ulcers in the mouth. When it progresses, it can result in pneumonia. Young kittens and senior cats are most at risk.

Feline Panleukopenia

  • Panleukopenia, or distemper, is spread from cat to cat and is so common that almost all cats will be exposed to it at some point in their life. Once a cat contracts this disease, they can die within 12 hours. Symptoms include vomiting, bloody diarrhea, and fever.

Are There Any Other Times That My Cat Will Need Vaccinations

When it comes to protecting against common infections, your cat will need additional booster vaccinations to maintain their protection, with the first boosters happening a year after their first vaccines. The frequency of booster vaccinations will depend on the vaccine, the age and health of your cat and the protection your pet needs – for example, cats who come into contact with other neighbourhood animals and go outside may need more protection. Your vet will be able to advise on the best schedule of vaccinations for your pet – annual health check ups are best for even the healthiest of pets!

If you are planning to travel with your cat, its also wise to take them to the vet for a health check, and to find out what vaccinations or boosters are needed ahead of travel. Keep in mind that certain destinations will require a vets certificate and vaccinations history to allow your pet to fly, often dated within a few days of travel. Always check ahead with airlines, and with your vet to understand whats required!

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Vaccinations For Adult Dogs: Boosters And Titers

There is a difference of opinion about having your adult dog vaccinated every year. Some vets believe too many vaccinations in adult dogs pose health risks. But others disagree, saying that yearly vaccinations will prevent dangerous diseases such as distemper. Talk with your vet to determine what kind of vaccination protocol works for you and your dog.

Many dog owners opt for titer tests before they administer annual vaccinations. Titer tests measure a dogs immunity levels, and this can determine which, if any, vaccinations are necessary. One key exception to this is rabies: a titer test is not an option when it comes to the rabies vaccine. This vaccination is required by law across the United States. Your vet can tell you the schedule for your particular state.

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How Often Do Cats Need Vaccines

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Your kitten will actually need a few doses of these vaccines until hes about 4 or 5 months old.

They should then get vaccinated every three to four weeks with the core vaccines of FCV, FHV and FPV until 16 to 20 weeks of age, Dr. Eldredge said. FeLV is given at 8 weeks and then one more about four weeks later.

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Are There Risks Associated With Cat Vaccinations

Cat vaccinations stimulate your kitten or cats immune system in order to create protection from specific infectious diseases. This can cause mild symptoms to occur ranging from soreness at the injection site to fever and allergic reactions. Cat vaccinations can cause other risks like injection site tumors and immune disease, however such incidences are extremely rare and are usually linked to pre-existing genetic and medical conditions. Because of the potential for injection site reactions, we give each vaccine in a specific location that is noted in the cats medical record.

The fact is, the rewards of cat vaccinations far outweigh any risks. Cat vaccines have saved countless lives and play a vital role in the battle against feline infectious disease. As with any medical procedure, there is a small chance of negative side effects. In most cases, the risks are much smaller than the risks of disease itself.

Does My Kitten Need Only Core Vaccines

Cats that go outside, live in multi-cat households where other cats go outside, or cats that go to boarding kennels should receive the feline leukemia vaccine. Feline leukemia is spread by any bodily secretion , so direct contact with other infected cats is not necessary to transmit disease. There is no cure if a cat becomes infected and cannot clear the virus. The virus suppresses the immune system and predisposes cats to lymphoma, and deadly infections. It is recommended that all kittens receive the feline leukemia vaccine the first year of life, as many kittens that were initially going to be indoor only, start going outside. The feline leukemia vaccine is given at 12 and 16 weeks of age.

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When Are Kitten Shots Given

Did you know a kitten’s disease-fighting ability begins with a healthy mother cat? According to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals , kittens take in disease-fighting antibodies from the mother cat’s milk when they nurse. Most kittens are weaned by around 8 weeks and receive their first vaccinations around the age of 6 to 8 weeks. Boosters will continue to be given every three to four weeks until the kitten reaches 16 weeks old or until the full series of vaccinations are complete.

If you adopt a cat older than that, your vet will help you identify what vaccines are recommended, what age you should begin with the shots and how long they’ll need to be given.

Frequency Of Vaccinations For Adult Cats And Boarding Facility Requirements

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The frequency of feline booster vaccinations varies from 1-3 years depending on the vaccine, the disease, and the risk of disease exposure to the individual cat. In general, it is recommended by expert panels on feline vaccination that cats who stay at a boarding cattery require an annual vaccination schedule as this can be a higher risk situation than a normal home environment . This is because boarding may be stressful for a cat and stress has immunosuppressive effects which may result in increased susceptibility to infection and disease and additionally there can be a higher risk of exposure to infectious disease.

For these reasons, it is still recommended that a cat should have a vaccination within 12 months of entering a boarding facility, and why almost all cat boarding facilities require cats to have received a vaccination booster within 12 months prior to admission to the facility.

It is best to speak to your vet about your cats individual needs. Your veterinarian will always do a health check before administering a vaccination to ensure your kitten or cat is healthy to be vaccinated. In addition, this provides an excellent opportunity for your veterinarian to fully examine your cat and discuss any health issues. This allows any health concerns that your cat may have to be addressed as early as possible, giving your cat the best chance possible to be healthy and comfortable.

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What Is The Fvrcp Vaccine And What Are The Core Vaccines For Cats

The FVRCP vaccine for cats is considered a core vaccine that protects against Feline Viral rhinotracheitis, Calicivirus and Panleukopenia. These viral diseases make up this core cat vaccine. Our clinic believes that all domestic animals should be vaccinated against rabies because this disease is fatal and transmissible to humans. We therefore consider the rabies vaccine a core cat vaccine.

Kitten Vaccination Schedule: A Guide For New Cat Owners

Reviewed by Dr. Sarah Wooten, DVM.

Congratulations on your new kitten! All of the snuggles, playtime, and endless joys of having a feline friend in your life are finally here.

As you cross off items on your new kitten checklist, one of the most important things you can do for your new family member is to take them to the veterinarian for their kitten examinations and vaccinations.

Vaccinations are essential for protecting your kitten from certain illnesses and preventing the spread of disease. In this article, well walk you through kitten vaccine basics, tell you what to expect at your first check-up, and give you a sample cat vaccination schedule to follow.

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How Often Do Cats Need Shots To Protect Against Rabies

The final common vaccine in cats protects against rabies. I have written many times that rabies is the most deadly infectious disease of both cats and humans. Truly, there is no disease that should be more dreaded. Rabies is spread through direct contact with infected mammals. Could an indoor cat be exposed to rabies? It is not likely but it is theoretically possible I have heard of rabid bats flying down chimneys or through open windows.

Should the owner of an indoor cat vaccinate his pet against rabies? That depends upon a number of factors, including your tolerance for risk, local laws , and a cats likelihood of biting people .

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How Much Do Kitten Vaccines Cost

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Bringing a new kitten into the family involves a multitude of expenses, and vaccines are a part of them. The cost of vaccines for your kitten can vary based on a number of factors such as your location, your veterinarian, the type of vaccine, etc.

In general, however, you can expect the cost of a single vaccine to range anywhere from $25 to $50. That said, some veterinarians may offer multiple services for your kitten vaccines, an examination, and deworming, for example packaged within a single price.

The frequent vet visits involved in the kitten vaccination schedule, these costs can add up, so it can be helpful to talk to your veterinarian ahead of time if you have any concerns about vaccine pricing.

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What Vaccines Do Cats Need

The Feline Vaccination Advisory Panel regularly evaluates and researches cat vaccination developments to make science-based recommendations.

The panel is comprised of dedicated feline veterinarians and scientists and is regarded as a reputable source of cat vaccination standards.

Their guidelines, published by the American Association of Feline Practitioners, are among the most trusted and utilized recommendations in the field.

They divide cat vaccines into two categories:

* FeLV: highly recommended for kittens and optional for adult cats.

** Rabies: 3-year vs 1-year vaccine depending on state laws.

What Are The Core Vaccines That My Kitten Must Have

Your kitten must be vaccinated against the following diseases:

  • Cat flu: caused by various pathogens, including feline herpesvirus and feline calicivirus . Cat flu affects the eyes, mouth and airways.
  • Feline panleukopenia virus : an often-fatal viral infection causing diarrhoea and vomiting.
  • Feline leukaemia virus : this suppresses the immune system, leaving the infected cat highly vulnerable to other diseases.

Your vet will be able to assess your kittens risk profile and the best age for vaccination. They will draw up a vaccination programme specifically suited to your kitten and their needs.

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How Often Do My Kittens Need A Vaccine

It is recommended that kittens receive the core FVRCP vaccine at 8, 12 and 16 weeks of age. The reason the vaccines are repeated is to boost the immune response. Ideally, the final vaccine is given around or after 16 weeks, to ensure that the maternal antibodies have left the system. Rabies can be given after 12 weeks of age and is usually given at the 16-week vaccine appointment.

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Is It Really Necessary To Over

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When given safely, multiple vaccinations can be given at the same time. Multiple vaccines are not associated with long-term health problems, according to research. We recommend that you separate vaccines for your cat based on his or her medical history because over-vaccinating your cat can be harmful.

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Myth: Vaccines Do More Harm Than Good

Every responsible cat parent is right to make an informed decision about whats best for their pet as an individual. However, when weighing up the pros and cons of vaccination, its relevant to know the benefits far outweigh the risks.

Diseases such as cat flu, distemper, and feline leukemia are still out there and have life-changing consequences. Balance this against the risks of vaccination which can be divided into common-but-mild reactions and rare-but-serious, as outlined below.

A Typical Puppy Vaccination Schedule:

  • First vaccination: 6 to 8 weeks DHP
  • Second vaccination: 9 to 11 weeks DHP
  • Third vaccination: 12 to 15 weeks DHP
  • Fourth vaccination: 16 to 20 weeks DHP
  • Booster DHP: 1 year of age or 12 months after the last puppy shot, then as recommended
  • Rabies vaccination: typically required by law at 3-6 months of age with a booster 12 months later, then a booster every 1-3 years.
  • Bordetella, Parainfluenza, and Canine Influenza recommended for social dogs .
  • Lyme or Leptospirosis: May be recommended by your veterinarian if you live in or travel with your dog to an area where these are endemic.

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